AsthmaCommunityNetwork.org

2010

Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center

Winner Blurb: 

Twelve years ago, the Woodhull North Brooklyn Health Network implemented its comprehensive, evidence-based asthma management program to ensure best practices for asthma care were used to treat all asthma patients. By educating and training health care providers, community organizations and schools, Woodhull has taken a multi-faceted approach to improving asthma care in one of the nation’s highest-risk communities for asthma. At the center of this approach is the Network’s leadership in heading the North Brooklyn Asthma Action Alliance, a coalition that partners with national organizations, community groups and health care facilities to deliver a high standard of asthma care to the community. Supporting this work, the program trains doctors, nurses and hospital residents with its PACE program, which aligns with the National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Asthma Care, and utilizes a modified Electronic Health Record to ensure that all of Woodhull’s providers deliver Guidelines-based care. In partnership with Rutgers University, Woodhull performs ground-breaking education on environmental triggers to schools, including the distribution of checklists and diagrams outlining the process to eliminate common triggers. Woodhull also addresses patients’ home environments, distributing environmental control products such as allergen-proof pillow and mattress covers free of charge. Woodhull has renovated the emergency department with a state-of-the-art asthma treatment room, which offers patients assistance with their paperwork while they begin treatment.

 

This fast-track approach has resulted in easier and more effective access to asthma treatment in emergency situations. The results of Woodhull’s work are captured in its Asthma Registry: The number of visits to the pediatric asthma clinic more than doubled between 2008 and 2009, which correlated to a 58 percent reduction in asthma-related emergency department visits and 67 percent decrease in hospitalizations.

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Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, and Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. EPA, present Award to (from left to right) Dr. Edward Fishkin and Desire La Tempa of the Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center

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WIN for Asthma, New York Presbyterian Hospital

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In 2005, a local hospital and community partners applied the principles of community- based participatory research to develop the Washington Heights Inwood Network (WIN) for Asthma. This comprehensive program is designed to facilitate effective and sustainable asthma management in Northern Manhattan, a community with childhood asthma rates that are four times the national average. WIN is a multi-level, community-driven program that enhances case identification and follow-up for children. Through collaboration with key partners, including local day care centers, schools, clinics and community-based organizations, WIN provides community-wide asthma screening and education. Once families are enrolled in the program, bilingual community health workers offer family-focused asthma education, address household triggers, and link families to the clinical and social resources needed to facilitate effective and sustainable asthma management. By engaging and supporting local providers through the delivery of the evidence-based intervention, Physician Asthma Care Education (PACE), WIN works to ensure providers adhere to the latest asthma guidelines, resulting in improved quality of care. Through a partnership with the National Initiative for Children’s Healthcare Quality, WIN developed a comprehensive protocol for post-PACE provider support involving practice-based support. Through collaboration with multiple hospital divisions, the launch of a grassroots marketing campaign, and the development of a long-term business plan, WIN has worked to increase its visibility and successfully sustain its program. WIN’s program success is demonstrated in data collected from Community Health Workers (CHWs): Over a 3-year period, the number of asthma related emergency department visits and hospitalizations decreased by more than 50 percent; caregivers’ confidence in controlling their children’s asthma increased by 40 percent; and asthma-related school absenteeism decreased by 30 percent.

Winnner Photo: 
Winner Photo Caption: 

Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, and Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. EPA, present Award to (from left to right) Robyn Scherer, Patricia Peretz and Dr. Luz Adriana Matiz of WIN for Asthma, New York Presbyterian Hospital

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Sinai Urban Health Institute

Winner Blurb: 

Since 2000, the Sinai Urban Health Institute (SUHI) and Sinai Children’s Hospital (SCH) have partnered to reduce the burden of asthma on vulnerable Chicago communities. As many as one in four children living in the communities served by the Sinai Health System suffer from asthma, as revealed by the Sinai Improving Community Health Survey. Recognizing the disproportionate asthma burden faced by these communities, a series of four comprehensive asthma interventions have been conducted over the past 10 years. Each of these initiatives has focused on decreasing asthma-related morbidity and improving participants’ quality of life by utilizing Community Health Workers (CHW)— members of the community trained to deliver case-specific asthma education through home visits. With funding from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, SUHI and SCH initiated a comprehensive, multifaceted program in September 2008, called Healthy Home, Healthy Child: The Westside Children’s Asthma Partnership (HHHC). This unique program draws from the strengths of its collaborations with partner organizations and community members to address medical, social and environmental factors of asthma. At the heart of this program is the CHW, who provides one-on-one asthma education and environmental trigger reduction counseling to families in their homes. The CHWs also serve as a liaison between the family and medical system. Cost savings analyses and evaluations of these programs have enabled SUHI to demonstrate the approach’s value, proving that the program was a wise investment. Since the inception of the SUHI Pediatric Asthma Programs, there has been on average a 50 percent reduction in frequency of symptoms experienced by children (50.4 percent – 63.6 percent) and significant declines in asthma-related emergency department visits (47.6 percent – 73.5 percent) and hospitalizations (50.0 percent – 81.0 percent). In addition, the SUHI Pediatric Asthma Model has been replicated in other areas around Illinois.

Winnner Photo: 
Winner Photo Caption: 

Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, and Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. EPA, present Award to (from left to right) Gloria Seals, Helen Margellos-Anast and Melissa A. Gutierrez of the Sinai Urban Health Institute

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Community Asthma Initiative, Children’s Hospital Boston

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Children’s Hospital Boston developed the Community Asthma Initiative (CAI) in 2005 in response to alarmingly high rates of asthma among children living in Boston’s urban neighborhoods, especially underserved children and families. CAI is a patient-centered program that provides bilingual (Spanish) in-home family asthma education, environmental assessments and remediation; Integrated Pest Management; and coordination with primary care providers, in conjunction with community education, outreach and advocacy. Care is provided and coordinated through a culturally appropriate case management model that identifies barriers to good asthma control and includes home visits conducted by nurses and/or community health workers, depending on the family’s needs. To ensure it provides the services and information the community needs most, CAI convenes a Family Advisory Board. In response to the Family Advisory Board’s vision, CAI delivered an Asthma Community Forum, with over 100 attendees discussing asthma-related issues, including environmental management in homes and schools. CAI also offers educational programs and activities for community-based organizations, schools and provider groups. For example, CAI, along with the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), hosts the Boston Asthma Swim Program, which provides children with asthma the opportunity to engage in physical activities while learning about asthma control. To improve insurance coverage for case management and home visits—and to increase access to affordable medications and reimbursements—CAI works closely with the Office of Government Relations at Children’s Hospital Boston, BPHC and community partners, providing support for policy and system changes. The Initiative has achieved impressive results. For CAI patients, asthma-related emergency department visits have dropped by 65 percent and hospitalizations have decreased by 81 percent. Further, CAI calculated a 146 percent return on investment (ROI) to society due to lower hospital costs. Enrolled families have also reported a reduction in the limitation of physical activity (37 percent), asthma- related school absences (39 percent), and asthma-related work absences (49 percent).

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Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, and Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. EPA, present Award to (from left to right) Susan Sommer and Dr. Elizabeth Woods of the Community Asthma Initiative, Children’s Hospital Boston

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Neighborhood Health Plan of Massachusetts

Winner Blurb: 

Founded in the late 1980s, Neighborhood Health Plan (NHP) was one of the nation’s first health plans to comprehensively address the health care needs of underserved populations. As part of its commitment to improving the lives of its 200,000 members and in response to alarming rates of asthma among the Plan’s target population, NHP introduced its innovative Asthma Disease Management Program (ADMP) in 2000. NHP provides an Asthma Home Visitation Program (AHVP) to all members living with asthma in need of in-depth asthma education and/or home environmental assessment. NHP implemented an Enhanced Asthma Home Visit program in 2005 based on the positive outcomes of a one year Inner City Asthma Study (ICAS) of non-clinician home-based environmental intervention to reduce exposure to environmental triggers and allergens. The AHVP empowers patients to proactively manage their asthma by providing multilingual, low-literacy education to patients and their families during in-home environmental assessments and interventions. In addition, the ADMP helps primary care providers improve asthma care by enhancing programs at primary care sites; using a robust and comprehensive asthma registry; and increasing provider awareness and compliance with asthma treatment guidelines. To further address the appropriate management of asthma, NHP’s website provides access to several provider-focused resources. By collaborating with community-based initiatives, including the Boston Asthma Initiative, the Greater Brockton Asthma Coalition, and State and regional partners, the ADMP’s active leadership strengthens Massachusetts’ community-wide approach to asthma management. Over the past decade, the rates of annual asthma hospitalizations and emergency department visits for Neighborhood Health Plan’s asthma population have fallen by more than 30 percent.

Winnner Photo: 
Winner Photo Caption: 

Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, and Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. EPA, present Award to (from left to right) John Pruett, Joy Gonzalez, Dr. James Glauber and Cindy Cookson of the Neighborhood Health Plan of Massachusetts

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