AsthmaCommunityNetwork.org

2011

New York State Department of Health, Center for Environmental Health, Healthy Neighborhoods Program

Winner Blurb: 

In the early 1980s, the New York State Department of Health, Center for Environmental Health recognized that housing hazards were often complex and were best addressed by a neighborhood-level approach. As a result, the Center developed the Healthy Neighborhoods Program in 1985 — a statewide program aimed at improving housing conditions in high-risk communities through a holistic, healthy homes approach.

 

This program relies on an extensive network of grant-funded, local health department partners and emphasizes home environmental management as an enhancement to case management and clinical care. Local health departments initially identify target areas in the community for intervention and develop work plans to meet the specific needs of that area. These health departments are also encouraged to leverage local resources and infrastructure to ensure that the services delivered are meaningful and effective. 

 

During home visits, field staff members assess a wide variety of healthy homes issues, including tobacco control, fire safety, lead poisoning prevention, indoor air quality, asthma control, injury prevention and more. Following the assessment, residents are provided with products, referrals and education to help remediate any potential hazards identified during the assessment. A quarter of homes receive a three-to-six month follow-up visit to reassess conditions. Any new or ongoing problems identified during the revisit are addressed.

 

This program has had incredible success for residents with asthma, with marked improvements in environmental triggers, including a 14% reduction in environmental tobacco smoke exposure and improved pest control in at least 44% of homes with pest problems. There have also been significant improvements in participants’ knowledge about asthma triggers and significant decreases in the number of days with worsening asthma and in the number of work or school days missed due to asthma.

Winnner Photo: 
Winner Photo Caption: 

Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air and Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, present Award to Amanda Reddy and Theresa McCabe of the New York State Department of Health, Center for Environmental Health, Healthy Neighborhoods Program

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South Bronx Asthma Partnership, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center

Winner Blurb: 

In New York’s South Bronx community, one in five school-aged children has asthma — one of the highest rates in New York City. In response to this staggering statistic, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center’s Department of Pediatrics created the Childhood Asthma Management Program in 2000. Through clinical pediatric asthma services, community-based activities of the New York State Department of Health-funded asthma coalition, and hospital-community collaborative programming, the program promotes asthma-friendly environments and ensures the delivery of integrated health care services for children with asthma. 

 

Early on, program staff members recognized that to improve asthma outcomes, they must not only improve provider knowledge and communication, but also strengthen the existing health system in which providers practice. As a result, the program conducts provider training sessions that translate asthma management recommendations into quality clinical practice to ensure that patients receive comprehensive asthma services across the care continuum. Furthermore, the program engages Medicaid to provide reimbursement incentives for provider participation in asthma education. 

 

As the lead organization of the South Bronx Asthma Partnership, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center also partners with a variety of environmental agencies and community organizations to create tailored environmental interventions that address both indoor and outdoor asthma triggers. Program partners provide building walk-throughs, designate asthma-friendly zones at schools, and provide pest management assistance and air-sampling. In addition, the program distributes culturally appropriate and literacy-sensitive educational materials throughout the hospital and the community to promote patient self-management and encourage healthy behaviors in homes.

 

This multi-faceted approach to asthma care has resulted in tremendous success. Since 2003, Bronx- Lebanon Hospital Center has shown a 42 percent decrease in asthma-related hospitalizations, as well as a decrease in the length of stay of asthma-related hospitalizations. This equates to an annual average cost savings of about $431 per child. In addition, the National Asthma Control Initiative recently named the Bronx Lebanon partnership as a clinical champion in recognition of their efforts in promoting the Expert Panel Report 3 – Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma.

Winnner Photo: 
Winner Photo Caption: 

Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air and Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, present Award to Lauren Brown, Alexandra Meis, Dr. Mamta Reddy, Tomas Jimenez, Diane Strom and Evelyn Arguinzoni of the South Bronx Asthma Partnership, Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center

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Centene Corporation ®, Nurtur ®, Managed Health Services

Winner Blurb: 

As an experienced, comprehensive service provider, Managed Health Services, a Centene Corporation Medicaid health plan, understands the need to customize asthma solutions for diverse populations. As a result, in 2007 Managed Health Services and sister company, Nurtur, Centene life, a health and wellness company, established a comprehensive asthma program designed to address the needs of several specific target audiences; these include persons with asthma in addition to other complex chronic conditions, as well as pregnant women and children with asthma.

 

Medical records, pharmacy records and claims data are scanned by predictive modeling software to identify patients that meet these criteria, who are then referred to the Asthma Team. A case manager follows up with each patient to assess their level of need and recommends an appropriate asthma intervention. Educational materials for children and adults, trigger identification training, goal-setting exercises, home visits and barrier assessments are just some of the many tools used as a part of this holistic asthma care process. The patient’s treatment plan is also updated by the Asthma Team and sent to the physician for review.

 

Continuous monitoring and evaluation are integral to this program, and results from 2007 to 2009 indicate an incredible 17.3 percent decrease in emergency department visits for child participants and a 9.4 percent decrease for adult participants. In addition, visits to primary physicians for children and adults were up by 11.1 percent and 16.4 percent, respectively, indicating improved preventive care.

Winnner Photo: 
Winner Photo Caption: 

Mike Flynn, Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air and Gina McCarthy, then Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. EPA, present Award to Patrick Rooney, Dr. Mary Mason and Dan Cave of Managed Health Services, Centene Corporation ® and Nurtur ®

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